GDPR Compliance

//GDPR Compliance

GDPR Compliance

The EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)

The EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) superseded the UK Data Protection Act 1998 on 25 May 2018. Significant and wide-reaching in scope, the new law brings a 21st century approach to data protection. It expands the rights of individuals to control how their personal data is collected and processed, and places a range of new obligations on organisations to be more accountable for data protection.

Personal data

The GDPR applies to personal data. This is any information that can directly or indirectly identify a natural person, and can be in any format. The Regulation places much stronger controls on the processing of special categories of personal data. The inclusion of genetic and biometric data is new.

The scope

The GDPR applies to all EU organisations – whether commercial business, charity or public authority – that collect, store or process the personal data of individuals residing in the EU, even if they’re not EU citizens. Organisations based outside the EU that offer goods or services to EU residents, monitor their behaviour or process their personal data will be subject to the GDPR.

Service providers (data processors) that process data on behalf of an organisation come under the remit of the GDPR and will have specific compliance obligations. An example might be a company that processes your payroll or a Cloud provider that offers data storage.

Right of access

The right of access (Article 15) is a data subject right. It gives citizens the right to access their personal data and information about how this personal data is being processed. A data controller must provide, upon request, an overview of the categories of data that are being processed (Article 15(1)(b)) as well as a copy of the actual data (Article 15(3)). Furthermore, the data controller has to inform the data subject on details about the processing, such as the purposes of the processing (Article 15(1)(a)), with whom the data is shared (Article 15(1)(c)), and how it acquired the data (Article 15(1)(g)).

A data subject must be able to transfer personal data from one electronic processing system to and into another, without being prevented from doing so by the data controller. Data that has been sufficiently anonymised is excluded, but data that has been only de-identified but remains possible to link to the individual in question, such as by providing the relevant identifier, is not. Both data being ‘provided’ by the data subject and data being ‘observed’, such as about behaviour, are included. In addition, the data must be provided by the controller in a structured and commonly used standard electronic format. The right to data portability is provided by Article 20 of the GDPR. Legal experts see in the final version of this measure a “new right” created that “reaches beyond the scope of data portability between two controllers as stipulated in [Article 20]”.

At NOCIR, we are fully aligned with the spirit of the GDPR for a safe and secure Internet. We aspire to embrace privacy by design and, whenever possible, to not collect and store personally identifiable information. For the personal data we do collect, we are committed to your right to privacy and to being transparent about how and why we store your data.

Today, we’re eager to share our progress to meet the new regulation requirements. If you’d like to check back on these details another time, they’re also available in our privacy page

2018-06-08T07:31:23+00:00